Uncle Vanya

1/9/2014 - 1/25/2014
12:00 AM
11:59 PM
Dietz
"Uncle Vanya" -- Jan 9 to 25, 2014

Running Thursday, Jan. 9 to Saturday, Jan. 25, 2014

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE

  • All Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
  • All Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m.
  • Saturday, Jan. 18 at 2:30 p.m.
  • All Sundays at 2:30 p.m.

A drama by Anton Chekhov
Adapted by David Mamet from a translation by Vlada Chernomirdik

Directed by Bob Belfance

Weathervane Playhouse ushers in 2014 with a new version of an old classic as the Playhouse presents Uncle Vanya, adapted by the celebrated American playwright David Mamet.

Working from a literal translation from Russian to English, Anton Chekhov’s 19th century Russian masterpiece retains its powerful themes and setting — but in Mamet’s creative hands the classic drama’s language, characters and situations are enlarged and enlivened for a modern audience.

Set on the crumbling estate of a retired professor and his beautiful young wife, Uncle Vanya presents a tangled web of desire that consumes various friends and family members who have sought refuge there.

The place is Russia and the year is 1899. A retired professor named Serebryakov has returned to his country estate with his beautiful young wife, Yelena. The estate originally belonged to his first wife, who is now deceased. The married couple has returned to the estate because the professor’s health has begun to decline. Upon their return, the professor reconnects with the extended family members who manage his estate: Mariya, the mother of his first wife; Sonya, his daughter by his first marriage; and Vanya, who is Mariya’s son.

County doctor Astrov, whose arrival to the estate marks the beginning of the play, is brought in to help cure the ailing professor. His presence causes a stir in the household, for he is ardently loved by the innocent Sonya.

When night falls at the estate, we get a true bearing of the acrimonious relationship between Vanya, who has been caretaker of the estate for 25 years, and the sickly Serebryakov. Serebryakov is being incredibly demanding in the wake of his illness, causing everyone in the household to view him with annoyance and despair.

Chekhov was quoted as saying, “Beauty brings a sense of loss. The possibility of happiness is thus too far removed. Life can give you a little, but beauty has a way of disturbing you because you can’t have it all.” It is difficult to define this kind of unhappiness, says Weathervane guest director Bob Belfance, but Chekhov explores it in his plays and most definitely in Uncle Vanya. "He has no theory of life to explain ala his contemporaries Henrik Ibsen or August Strindberg," says Belfance, " but he is perhaps the greatest author in the understanding of human beings. He understands that humans live their lives inwardly."

Background on the Play and this Adaptation

This legendary and influential Russian play debuted at the Moscow Art Theatre in 1899 and has continued to impact the theater world ever since, influencing such well known American playwrights as Eugene O’Neill, Tennessee Williams and Edward Albee. The equally influential American playwright David Mamet was commissioned to create an adaptation of Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya in 1988 after his successful recreation of Chekhov’s play The Cherry Orchard. Mamet's adaptation of Uncle Vanya opened in April 1988 at the American Repertory Theater in Cambridge, Mass. Mamet has cited Chekhov as one of the major influences on his theatrical ideas, and he viewed his work in Chekhovian adaptation as “the practical approach to grasping Chekhov’s technique,” according to author Ira Bruce Nadel (in his book, David Mamet: a Life in the Theatre). Mamet’s adaptation of Uncle Vanya also made it to the silver screen: It was the basis for his screenplay for the film Vanya on 42nd Street, directed by Louis Malle and released in 1994.

TICKET INFORMATION

$18
$16 for Weathervane subscribers
$5 for children (ages 17 and younger) and college students

Uncle Vanya is presented in Weathervane Playhouse's John L. Dietz Theater, the intimate 48-seat "second stage." All seats are sold on a general-admission basis ("first come, first seated"). Typically, seating begins 30 minutes before each performance. Ticketholders are encouraged to arrive no later than 10 minutes before the performance.

BOX OFFICE INFORMATION

Buy tickets in person or by telephone (330-836-2626) during the following hours:
• Mondays: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Tuesdays through Fridays: 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
• Performance Saturdays only: Noon to 5 p.m.
• The Box Office is also open beginning one hour before each performance and remains open until the final curtain.

CLICK HERE to buy tickets online.

THE CAST

DALE M. FRANKS
Alexandr Vladimirovich Serebyakov

AMANDA LARKIN
Yelena Andreyevna

JEN KLIKA
Sofya Alexandrovna

BARBARA TROTTER
Mariya Vasilyevna Voynitzkaya

ALEX CIKRA
Ivan Petrovich Voynitzky

JIM FIPPIN
Mikhail Lvovich Astrov

TIM KELLEY
Ilya Ilyich Telegin

MARCI PAOLUCCI
Marina

THE CREATIVE TEAM

BOB BELFANCE
Director

GREG BEALER
Stage Manager

JUSTYN TYLER JAYMES
Costume Designer

SUE STOUT-DAVIS
Lighting Designer

DAN LEVAN
Properties Designer

ALAN SCOTT FERRALL
Sound Designer, Scenic Designer and Technical Director

KATHY KOHL
Asasistant Technical Director

 

Box Office Info

Mondays: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesdays-Fridays: 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Performance Saturdays: Noon to 5 p.m.

The Box Office is also open beginning one hour before each performance.

Get tickets by phone at 330-836-2626
or purchase online.*

*A per-ticket surcharge will be added to each Internet sale.
*Group orders are not available online.

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